Religious Liberty
Becket

Against their better judgment

Religious Liberty | U.S. Circuit judges call for a full court reversal of their own decision
by Bonnie Pritchett
Posted 9/18/18, 05:10 pm

A Florida city this week called on the U.S. Supreme Court to allow a 75-year-old cross monument to stand. The appeal came after a federal appeals court earlier this month reluctantly ruled against Pensacola, Fla. In a 3-0 decision in Kondrat’Yev v. Pensacola, a panel of judges on the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said their hands were tied by precedent in upholding a decision that the cross on city property violates the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

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Associated Press/Photo by Danny Johnston

Liberty behind bars

Religious Liberty | Officials and the courts are grappling with how to maintain security and protect religious liberties in prisons
by Bonnie Pritchett
Posted 9/11/18, 02:23 pm

In 2015, Arkansas inmate Gregory Holt was the first person in the United States to successfully invoke the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (RLUIPA) to defend his religious liberty as a prisoner all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. In Holt v. Hobbs, the high court unanimously ruled Holt should be allowed to grow a half-inch beard as a demonstration of his Muslim faith.

Congress passed RLUIPA in 2000, and though Liberties has often covered the “Religious Land Use” portion of the act, the “Institutionalized Persons” portion is seldom referenced.

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Associated Press/Photo by Rich Pedroncelli

Speak freely

Religious Liberty | Therapists and clients get a reprieve from the California Assembly
by Bonnie Pritchett
Posted 9/04/18, 04:31 pm

The California Assembly on Friday temporarily shelved a bill banning so-called “conversion therapy” for homosexual and transgender adults. Opponents of Assembly Bill 2943 thanked its author, openly gay Democratic Assemblyman Evan Low, for withdrawing the bill that threatened Californians’ free speech and religious liberty rights.

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