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John Piper

Hard questions in hard times

Is the coronavirus turning our attention toward God?

Handout/Desiring God

Earlier this week in an interview with Fox News about the coronavirus, Franklin Graham said, “I don’t think God planned for this to happen. It’s because of the sin that’s in the world, Judge. Man has turned his back on God. We have sinned against Him, and we need to ask for God’s forgiveness. And that’s what Easter is all about.”

Several outlets reported on Graham’s remarks. The Washington Post specifically noted another of Graham’s comments: “We have worshipped other gods in this country, and those gods are sports or entertainment. … The people we’ve idolized are on the shelf. I think God is trying to get our attention.”

Some media outlets seemed puzzled about Graham connecting the coronavirus to sin if he wasn’t calling the pandemic a punishment from God.

For The World and Everything in It, we spoke with John Piper—author, theologian, and founder of the ministry Desiring God. Here are edited excerpts of our conversation.

The world is asking questions about judgment or punishment in really urgent ways. The basic question is: Is God punishing us? What connection do you find in the Bible between physical afflictions and God’s methods for getting our attention, as Franklin Graham put it?

What comes to my mind are two passages. One is general—maybe more abstract—and the other is really, really, really specific. And it’s the way Jesus thought.

The first one is Romans 8:19-23, and it relates especially to the connection between sin—or the moral condition of our heart—and the physical state of the world. It talks about the creation being subjected to futility, not of its own will, but the will of Him who subjected it in hope, and that’s God. Satan didn’t subject it in hope. Adam and Eve didn’t subject it in hope. God—we call it “the fall,” we call it “the curse”—subjected the world to futility and to corruption. Now, that involves every manner of misery for thousands of years. And death. Everybody dies because of that moment. It’s a horrific judgment from God and it’s in everybody’s life.

And my question: “Oh my goodness. Why did God take out the moral issue on the physical world?” I mean, Adam and Eve made a moral, crazy, sinful mistake when they said, “I prefer me over God, and I prefer Satan’s advice over God’s advice.”

So how do you answer that question?

God knows that sinful people are blind to the moral outrage of belittling God through their indifference or their sin. Nobody loses any sleep in this world over the fact that we pay more attention to the style of our hair than we do our creator. But you let God touch their body, touch their body with cancer, or you get a horrible sore throat right now. Touch that and, man, are we awake? We are wide awake and we’re saying, “Where are you God?”

That’s God’s way of saying, “OK, if you are blind to the moral outrage of sin, because of your own fallenness, how will I confront people? How will I give them a thunderclap of awakening so that they can see the outrage of their failed relationship with God?”

So it’s not just the coronavirus. When I get sick, I think it’s God’s wake up call: “Get serious, Piper. You’re going to die and your relationship with me is not all it should be.”

So, I don’t go around looking for people to say, “Well, this is punishment for you and this is not for you.” I think it’s punishment on those who are unrepentant, and God transforms punishment into purification for those who are in Christ Jesus.

What’s the second passage you thought of?

The people came to Jesus in Luke 13. Pilate had murdered some people in the temple, and the Tower of Siloam had fallen on 18 people—evidently just bystanders—and the people wanted to know: “OK, Jesus, tell me what’s up with this. What about all these people dying? What have they done?”

Talk about moving from abstract to concrete: Jesus looked them right in the eye and said, “You’re astonished that 18 people died or that 10,000 people have died of coronavirus? You’re astonished at that? Here’s what you ought to be astonished at, that you haven’t died yet.”

That’s exactly what He said: “Unless you repent, you”—he didn’t say they. “You will perish if you don’t repent.”

We can draw a straight line from those two passages to the coronavirus. God is saying to the world: The moral outrage of the sin that pervades this world is as great as the horror you see in this coronavirus.

The second thing He’s saying is, “Unless you repent, you will all likewise perish.” So when Franklin Graham turned from his first statement about “God didn’t plan this” to his other statement, namely, “God’s doing something to get our attention,” he was on the right track the second time.

What would you say to Christians who may be feeling tossed by some pretty wild swings of emotion right now?

That’s almost a paraphrase of Ephesians 4. Christ doesn’t want His people to be like leaves blowing around or waves tossed by the sea. So the fact that He would even go there with that kind of imagery says He knows what you’re talking about, and so does everybody else. Our affections, the emotional dimensions of us, are quite responsive to a sick wife or a sick husband and a frustrated house lockup.

When I have to deal with my emotions going up and down and sideways, I have to fly to the Word of God. I have to fly to promises. And the illustration that I used in the book that I just finished was when I walked into my urologist office 12 years ago. I was feeling great, and he does his usual exam, and then he looks me in the eye and says, “I want to do a biopsy.” And at that moment, you talk about an emotional swing.

I said, “Why?”

He said, “Just feels a little unusual.”

I said, “When?”

He said, “Now.” So he goes to get the machine, and I’m left alone for about 10 minutes. I’m alone with my emotions doing what your emotions do, right

And God—because I’ve spent 65 years reading my Bible and had some things stored up here—brought to my mind something from—I can’t remember if it was the same morning or just recently—and it was as though God said to me, “You are not appointed for wrath, but you are appointed for salvation through the Lord Jesus Christ who died for you, so that whether you wake or sleep, you might live with Him.”

I’ll tell you, that was so perfect at that moment. He did not say to me, “You’re not going to die of cancer, Piper.” He did not say that. He said, “Whether you live or die, I’m with you. You’re mine. You’re going to be with me.” That’s all I needed.

So we trust God’s sovereignty, no matter what.

My answer is we fly to the Word, and we lay hold on promises—promises about frustration and anxiety. Promises about the sicknesses of our loved ones. When we talk about the sovereignty of God in this, nobody spoke more sweetly and firmly about the sovereignty of God than Jesus. He said, “Not a sparrow falls to the ground apart from your Father.” Now, that’s first-century language for, “There are no rogue viruses.” None. There are no maverick molecules, to quote R.C. Sproul.

The next thing out of His mouth is: “The hairs of your head are all numbered. You are of more value than many sparrows.” Now, that’s what makes Jesus so unparalleled in His way of talking. Where should we go? You have the words of eternal life.

And so on the one hand, Jesus is saying to you in your emotional swings and me in mine: “I’ve got this world in my hands, and not one sparrow is going to fall out of a tree apart from my design, my purpose, my plan. And, by the way, even though Piper doesn’t have as many hairs on his head as he used to, I know exactly how many there are.”

So God’s not aloof. He knows us and our trials.

I remember the way my wife used to braid the hair of our African-American daughter. And hair matters. So you take hours doing this hair, and I used to watch her and I used to think: That’s a beautiful picture of how God counts my hairs. He’s taking every one. He’s folding it just right. So He’s attentive and He’s sovereign and then He says, “You’re of more value than many sparrows.”

So I think when you get words like that in your head and heart and then you pray down the Holy Spirit, He applies the words to our lives and there is a peace. I think what Paul says when he says, “peace that passes understanding” is peace that is produced in a way that goes beyond what reason can produce.

Along with stories of suffering from illness, we’re reading about GDP loss and massive unemployment. We’re hearing stories of people, often people the least able to afford it, suddenly being out of work. Those of us in the so-called knowledge economy can work from home. We keep earning paychecks. But what about those who can’t?

And I should preface, we don’t want to worship mammon. But I think we’re in danger of ignoring the economists, or, worse, looking down our noses at them as indifferent to life.

Well, I certainly don’t know the answer to when more harm is going to be done by pulling workers off the job than keeping them on the job. What surprises me in our day is how quick people are to judge our leaders for the decisions they are making, as though they were God. I don’t have a clue how to weigh the horrific costs in life for job loss or house loss over against the possible health loss of getting out and going to work. I mean, who knows? Who can know what this virus is going to do?

I mean, if we sent everybody back to work and then 5 million people died in the next three weeks, we’d probably say, “Well, that wasn’t the right idea.”

And so health and economic well-being are not easily distinguished.

The economic costs are more difficult to immediately assess than getting sick and dying. That’s easy to assess. And so I’m praying earnestly for our leaders—many of whom I don’t like and think their attitudes stink—help the rest of us know how to make these calls because I surely don’t.

You know, we used to say as an eldership, when we don’t know what to do, we know what to do when we don’t know what to do. We pray. And God was so merciful to us many times when we had absolutely no idea what the solution to an issue facing us was. And we’d call these extra prayer and fasting mornings and say, “God, we don’t know what to do. We don’t know what the solution to this is.” And I never failed to see Him answer when we did that. And so I think that ambiguity and inscrutability is another summons to the people of God: Get on your faces and repent and pray.

Let me say thanks on behalf of WORLD for offering your book Coronavirus and Christ, which you just wrote—and for making it available free to our readers and listeners. It’s a thoughtful and brief, 100-page, book aimed at exactly this time in history.

Share this article with friends.

John Piper

Hard questions in hard times

Is the coronavirus turning our attention toward God?

Handout/Desiring God

Earlier this week in an interview with Fox News about the coronavirus, Franklin Graham said, “I don’t think God planned for this to happen. It’s because of the sin that’s in the world, Judge. Man has turned his back on God. We have sinned against Him, and we need to ask for God’s forgiveness. And that’s what Easter is all about.”

Several outlets reported on Graham’s remarks. The Washington Post specifically noted another of Graham’s comments: “We have worshipped other gods in this country, and those gods are sports or entertainment. … The people we’ve idolized are on the shelf. I think God is trying to get our attention.”

Some media outlets seemed puzzled about Graham connecting the coronavirus to sin if he wasn’t calling the pandemic a punishment from God.

For The World and Everything in It, we spoke with John Piper—author, theologian, and founder of the ministry Desiring God. Here are edited excerpts of our conversation.

The world is asking questions about judgment or punishment in really urgent ways. The basic question is: Is God punishing us? What connection do you find in the Bible between physical afflictions and God’s methods for getting our attention, as Franklin Graham put it?

What comes to my mind are two passages. One is general—maybe more abstract—and the other is really, really, really specific. And it’s the way Jesus thought.

The first one is Romans 8:19-23, and it relates especially to the connection between sin—or the moral condition of our heart—and the physical state of the world. It talks about the creation being subjected to futility, not of its own will, but the will of Him who subjected it in hope, and that’s God. Satan didn’t subject it in hope. Adam and Eve didn’t subject it in hope. God—we call it “the fall,” we call it “the curse”—subjected the world to futility and to corruption. Now, that involves every manner of misery for thousands of years. And death. Everybody dies because of that moment. It’s a horrific judgment from God and it’s in everybody’s life.

And my question: “Oh my goodness. Why did God take out the moral issue on the physical world?” I mean, Adam and Eve made a moral, crazy, sinful mistake when they said, “I prefer me over God, and I prefer Satan’s advice over God’s advice.”

So how do you answer that question?

God knows that sinful people are blind to the moral outrage of belittling God through their indifference or their sin. Nobody loses any sleep in this world over the fact that we pay more attention to the style of our hair than we do our creator. But you let God touch their body, touch their body with cancer, or you get a horrible sore throat right now. Touch that and, man, are we awake? We are wide awake and we’re saying, “Where are you God?”

That’s God’s way of saying, “OK, if you are blind to the moral outrage of sin, because of your own fallenness, how will I confront people? How will I give them a thunderclap of awakening so that they can see the outrage of their failed relationship with God?”

So it’s not just the coronavirus. When I get sick, I think it’s God’s wake up call: “Get serious, Piper. You’re going to die and your relationship with me is not all it should be.”

So, I don’t go around looking for people to say, “Well, this is punishment for you and this is not for you.” I think it’s punishment on those who are unrepentant, and God transforms punishment into purification for those who are in Christ Jesus.

What’s the second passage you thought of?

The people came to Jesus in Luke 13. Pilate had murdered some people in the temple, and the Tower of Siloam had fallen on 18 people—evidently just bystanders—and the people wanted to know: “OK, Jesus, tell me what’s up with this. What about all these people dying? What have they done?”

Talk about moving from abstract to concrete: Jesus looked them right in the eye and said, “You’re astonished that 18 people died or that 10,000 people have died of coronavirus? You’re astonished at that? Here’s what you ought to be astonished at, that you haven’t died yet.”

That’s exactly what He said: “Unless you repent, you”—he didn’t say they. “You will perish if you don’t repent.”

We can draw a straight line from those two passages to the coronavirus. God is saying to the world: The moral outrage of the sin that pervades this world is as great as the horror you see in this coronavirus.

The second thing He’s saying is, “Unless you repent, you will all likewise perish.” So when Franklin Graham turned from his first statement about “God didn’t plan this” to his other statement, namely, “God’s doing something to get our attention,” he was on the right track the second time.

What would you say to Christians who may be feeling tossed by some pretty wild swings of emotion right now?

That’s almost a paraphrase of Ephesians 4. Christ doesn’t want His people to be like leaves blowing around or waves tossed by the sea. So the fact that He would even go there with that kind of imagery says He knows what you’re talking about, and so does everybody else. Our affections, the emotional dimensions of us, are quite responsive to a sick wife or a sick husband and a frustrated house lockup.

When I have to deal with my emotions going up and down and sideways, I have to fly to the Word of God. I have to fly to promises. And the illustration that I used in the book that I just finished was when I walked into my urologist office 12 years ago. I was feeling great, and he does his usual exam, and then he looks me in the eye and says, “I want to do a biopsy.” And at that moment, you talk about an emotional swing.

I said, “Why?”

He said, “Just feels a little unusual.”

I said, “When?”

He said, “Now.” So he goes to get the machine, and I’m left alone for about 10 minutes. I’m alone with my emotions doing what your emotions do, right

And God—because I’ve spent 65 years reading my Bible and had some things stored up here—brought to my mind something from—I can’t remember if it was the same morning or just recently—and it was as though God said to me, “You are not appointed for wrath, but you are appointed for salvation through the Lord Jesus Christ who died for you, so that whether you wake or sleep, you might live with Him.”

I’ll tell you, that was so perfect at that moment. He did not say to me, “You’re not going to die of cancer, Piper.” He did not say that. He said, “Whether you live or die, I’m with you. You’re mine. You’re going to be with me.” That’s all I needed.

So we trust God’s sovereignty, no matter what.

My answer is we fly to the Word, and we lay hold on promises—promises about frustration and anxiety. Promises about the sicknesses of our loved ones. When we talk about the sovereignty of God in this, nobody spoke more sweetly and firmly about the sovereignty of God than Jesus. He said, “Not a sparrow falls to the ground apart from your Father.” Now, that’s first-century language for, “There are no rogue viruses.” None. There are no maverick molecules, to quote R.C. Sproul.

The next thing out of His mouth is: “The hairs of your head are all numbered. You are of more value than many sparrows.” Now, that’s what makes Jesus so unparalleled in His way of talking. Where should we go? You have the words of eternal life.

And so on the one hand, Jesus is saying to you in your emotional swings and me in mine: “I’ve got this world in my hands, and not one sparrow is going to fall out of a tree apart from my design, my purpose, my plan. And, by the way, even though Piper doesn’t have as many hairs on his head as he used to, I know exactly how many there are.”

So God’s not aloof. He knows us and our trials.

I remember the way my wife used to braid the hair of our African-American daughter. And hair matters. So you take hours doing this hair, and I used to watch her and I used to think: That’s a beautiful picture of how God counts my hairs. He’s taking every one. He’s folding it just right. So He’s attentive and He’s sovereign and then He says, “You’re of more value than many sparrows.”

So I think when you get words like that in your head and heart and then you pray down the Holy Spirit, He applies the words to our lives and there is a peace. I think what Paul says when he says, “peace that passes understanding” is peace that is produced in a way that goes beyond what reason can produce.

Along with stories of suffering from illness, we’re reading about GDP loss and massive unemployment. We’re hearing stories of people, often people the least able to afford it, suddenly being out of work. Those of us in the so-called knowledge economy can work from home. We keep earning paychecks. But what about those who can’t?

And I should preface, we don’t want to worship mammon. But I think we’re in danger of ignoring the economists, or, worse, looking down our noses at them as indifferent to life.

Well, I certainly don’t know the answer to when more harm is going to be done by pulling workers off the job than keeping them on the job. What surprises me in our day is how quick people are to judge our leaders for the decisions they are making, as though they were God. I don’t have a clue how to weigh the horrific costs in life for job loss or house loss over against the possible health loss of getting out and going to work. I mean, who knows? Who can know what this virus is going to do?

I mean, if we sent everybody back to work and then 5 million people died in the next three weeks, we’d probably say, “Well, that wasn’t the right idea.”

And so health and economic well-being are not easily distinguished.

The economic costs are more difficult to immediately assess than getting sick and dying. That’s easy to assess. And so I’m praying earnestly for our leaders—many of whom I don’t like and think their attitudes stink—help the rest of us know how to make these calls because I surely don’t.

You know, we used to say as an eldership, when we don’t know what to do, we know what to do when we don’t know what to do. We pray. And God was so merciful to us many times when we had absolutely no idea what the solution to an issue facing us was. And we’d call these extra prayer and fasting mornings and say, “God, we don’t know what to do. We don’t know what the solution to this is.” And I never failed to see Him answer when we did that. And so I think that ambiguity and inscrutability is another summons to the people of God: Get on your faces and repent and pray.

Let me say thanks on behalf of WORLD for offering your book Coronavirus and Christ, which you just wrote—and for making it available free to our readers and listeners. It’s a thoughtful and brief, 100-page, book aimed at exactly this time in history.

Share this article with friends.

Michael Medved

Remarkable providences

Accidents, adjournments, and absences in U.S. history manifest the fingerprints of God

Illustration by Raul Allen

Passover and Easter are brothers, as are Jews and Christians, as are (metaphorically) national talk show host Michael Medved and I. We both grew up in Jewish homes and had immigrant grandparents who grew to love America. He became an Orthodox Jew, I became a Christian, and we’ve both written books praising this sweet land of liberty. 

We also agree that God acts providentially in history, but I tend to emphasize more that we don’t know why some things happen. In Michael’s new book, God’s Hand on America: Divine Providence in the Modern Era, he tells of how William Seward in 1867 pushed hard for the United States to purchase Alaska, while others mocked him and called it “Seward’s icebox.” We talked about Seward and then moved on to others: Here are edited excerpts. 

Let’s discuss some of the remarkable deliverances you describe. William Seward, Abraham Lincoln’s Secretary of State, broke his jaw in a carriage accident nine days before the night of Lincoln’s assassination. Seward was in bed and almost helpless when Lewis Powell, an accomplice of John Wilkes Booth, came to murder him.

What delivered him was the contraption the doctors had set up—a device made of metal plates that covered his throat and set his jaw in place. Powell brought the knife down at least four times against Seward’s throat, but it kept hitting the metal plate. If Seward had not survived, America would not have acquired Alaska from Russia in 1867, and in 1962 the Soviet Union would have had missiles not just in Cuba but in Juneau. 

So that metal plate Seward had because of the accident was part of God’s providence—but if Seward hadn’t had that accident, he might have been better able to defend himself. He might even have gone with his wife to Ford’s Theatre with Abraham and Mary Lincoln and saved Lincoln’s life. We know that God does act providentially, but couldn’t that carriage accident have been curse rather than blessing-in-disguise?

It’s beyond what we really know, but not what we can infer. I also learned that Seward believed America should acquire any property that it could. He was behind the Guano Islands Act, an 1856 law that gave the United States claim to any island with bird droppings on them that could be used for fertilizer if that island wasn’t claimed by anyone else. Seward, in the midst of his negotiations for Alaska, filed the papers to give America title to Midway Atoll.

In 1942 the battle near that island was the turning point in the war with Japan.

Does this mean that without Seward taking that step America would not have won the war in the Pacific? I’m not arguing that, but there’s something extraordinarily haunting in the providential deliverance of Secretary Seward, at a very grim time when the president of the United States had been lost.

You also write about Theodore Roo­sevelt escaping death during the Spanish-American War, and then escaping assassination in 1912 when a folded-up speech and an eyeglasses case slowed up a bullet aimed at his heart.

Roosevelt was a prime target as he led his regiment on horseback during the so-called Battle of San Juan Hill, but he went untouched: Eyewitnesses to the battle believed there was something supernatural about that. Later, the United States at the beginning of World War I had a military the size of Portugal’s. Without the pressure to grow the Army that Roosevelt provided, it is unlikely that we would have had the same results we did in World War I.

It is amazing that in 1912 he spoke for an hour with a bullet in him, but the election overall was a disaster. The Republican Party, split between Taft and Roosevelt, allowed Woodrow Wilson to be elected. He was an awful president, and it seems to me the U.S. entry into World War I was a mistake. After the assassination attempt, was Roosevelt’s continuing to run a blessing or a curse? 

I’m also very skeptical about the idea that America did the right thing by entering the war, but there was no doubt in Roosevelt’s mind that we had to do that. He maintained that belief even though his youngest son, Quentin, was killed in the war.

I do like your profiles, and we’re agreed that it would have been a disaster had Henry Wallace, Franklin Roosevelt’s vice president during the early 1940s, become president in 1945.

In 1944 Henry Wallace was vice president. Roosevelt did not know the extent to which Wallace had been deeply involved with the extreme left, including the Communist Party, and with a guru cult. The Democratic convention featured a rousing demonstration on behalf of Wallace. Florida Sen. Claude Pepper was rushing to the podium to place Wallace’s name in nomination, but seconds before he reached the podium the convention chairman gaveled an adjournment for the day—and the next day Harry Truman gained the nomination. 

Wallace would have gained the nomination in that burst of excitement.

Pepper tried to speak through his microphone, but it had been turned off. All of this had to do with behind-the-scenes manipulation by some political bosses, but it was not only important to some of these political bosses: It was impor­tant to the boss of the universe. It was very important in the cosmic scheme of things that Stalinism not be the wave of the future. Truman made all the difference in setting up the structures that allowed us to win the Cold War, and in recognizing the state of Israel 12 minutes after it was proclaimed.

Didn’t Wallace later realize some of his errors?

Wallace ran as a basically pro-Stalinist fringe candidate in 1948, against Truman. The story of that campaign is remarkable and horrifying, but later he acknowledged that he had been wrong about Stalin, and seemed to acknowledge that it was good Truman replaced him as vice president. It was a great providential blessing that the churchgoing and hymn-singing Baptist boy from Missouri became president rather than the guru-following New Ager from Iowa.

Amen on that. It’s amazing that 75 years have gone by since Truman approved the dropping of nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. I’m not aware of any other time in human history that a massively effective new weapon hasn’t been used for such a long time. That to me is a great sign of God’s mercy.

I think it is. I do ask: Why would God, Who has special protection for America, allow Abraham Lincoln to be shot in 1865? I keep coming back to Lincoln’s sense of himself as a humble instrument of God’s purposes. I see Lincoln was sent for the purpose of preserving the Union and ending slavery, both of which he accomplished literally days before his killing. It’s utterly extraordinary, and seems to be God wanting to call attention to His own purposes, that the surrender at Appomattox by Robert E. Lee was on Palm Sunday, and Lincoln is killed on Good Friday.

You also write about Martin Luther King Jr.

In his final speech, 19 hours before he was killed, King reflected in detail about how close he came to dying with an assassin’s knife in his heart 11 years before. He thanked God for having preserved him for those years. His sense of purpose and instrumentality was remarkable.

But many historians write as if God does not exist.

In American historiography there’s a great tendency to downplay a specifically Christian element. That’s a shame. Even Thomas Paine, who challenged Christian belief, saw that there was no explanation for what had happened in the formation of the United States of America without looking to a higher power.

Let’s conclude with some thankfulness about the bad but educational political experiences each of us had in the 1970s soon after college. You briefly became the campaign manager for a radical congressman, Ron Dellums, who represented the People’s Republic of Berkeley, Calif. What was the most horrifying part?

First was the use of cocaine, because I have never been a drug-sympathetic person. The second most horrifying part was campaign money doled out in cash and paper bags. 

That contributed to your movement from left to right?

It wasn’t just Dellums, it was living in Berkeley: My four years there were three of the happiest days of my life. You could say that mad Berkeley hurled me into conservatism, because in America we make our political decisions not necessarily by feeling enthusiastic for one side but by recoiling in horror from the other side. That was certainly my experience in the early 1970s.

Which came first, your political change or your movement from secular to Orthodox Judaism?

Probably religious change first. I was dating a young lady and believed my parents were negative toward her simply because she wasn’t Jewish. I was determined to show them the values of Judaism were more universal and started looking at Jewish texts for the first time to win those arguments. I found those texts compelling. I began experimenting with a minor Jewish observance: candle-lighting on Friday night, going to Shabbat meals. Every aspect of Jewish observance, including some of the dietary restrictions and daily prayer, improved the quality of my life, made me happier.

You’re 71 and must be thinking of mortality. Judaism has had broad debates about what happens after death. Where do you come out on that?

That’s an extraordinarily complicated question. The most widely accepted sort of itemization of the fundamentals of Jewish faith is that provided by ­Maimonides, who died in 1204. One of his 13 principles of faith is believing that the soul is eternal: There is a ­resurrection.

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