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Vincent Yu/AP

Protesters march through the streets of Hong Kong on Sunday. (Vincent Yu/AP)

‘Sing hallelujah to the Lord’

Christians are a highly visible presence in Hong Kong protests

Tides of protesters dressed in black flooded the streets of Hong Kong for the second consecutive Sunday to protest the controversial extradition bill that could see residents sent to mainland China to stand trial.

According to organizers’ estimates, nearly two million people attended the march, making it the biggest protest in the city’s history with more than a quarter of the population participating. The police estimate a much lower turnout of 338,000.

Although Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam announced on Saturday that she would indefinitely suspend the bill, protesters nearly doubled in number from the previous Sunday’s protest. Many were infuriated after police used excessive force on young protesters on Wednesday.

On Sunday evening, Lam apologized for government inadequacies that led to “many citizens feeling disappointed and upset.” Still, protesters were unsatisfied, calling for Lam’s resignation, the withdrawal of the extradition bill, and accountability for police violence. They called for Hong Kong police to rescind the description of the June 12 protest as a “riot.” If prosecuted for rioting, convicted protesters could face up to 10 years in prison.

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Vincent Yu/AP

Protesters march through the streets of Hong Kong on Sunday. (Vincent Yu/AP)

‘Sing hallelujah to the Lord’

Christians are a highly visible presence in Hong Kong protests

Tides of protesters dressed in black flooded the streets of Hong Kong for the second consecutive Sunday to protest the controversial extradition bill that could see residents sent to mainland China to stand trial.

According to organizers’ estimates, nearly two million people attended the march, making it the biggest protest in the city’s history with more than a quarter of the population participating. The police estimate a much lower turnout of 338,000.

Although Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam announced on Saturday that she would indefinitely suspend the bill, protesters nearly doubled in number from the previous Sunday’s protest. Many were infuriated after police used excessive force on young protesters on Wednesday.

On Sunday evening, Lam apologized for government inadequacies that led to “many citizens feeling disappointed and upset.” Still, protesters were unsatisfied, calling for Lam’s resignation, the withdrawal of the extradition bill, and accountability for police violence. They called for Hong Kong police to rescind the description of the June 12 protest as a “riot.” If prosecuted for rioting, convicted protesters could face up to 10 years in prison.

Share this article with friends.

Vincent Yu/AP

Protesters march through the streets of Hong Kong on Sunday. (Vincent Yu/AP)

‘Sing hallelujah to the Lord’

Christians are a highly visible presence in Hong Kong protests

Tides of protesters dressed in black flooded the streets of Hong Kong for the second consecutive Sunday to protest the controversial extradition bill that could see residents sent to mainland China to stand trial.

According to organizers’ estimates, nearly two million people attended the march, making it the biggest protest in the city’s history with more than a quarter of the population participating. The police estimate a much lower turnout of 338,000.

Although Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam announced on Saturday that she would indefinitely suspend the bill, protesters nearly doubled in number from the previous Sunday’s protest. Many were infuriated after police used excessive force on young protesters on Wednesday.

On Sunday evening, Lam apologized for government inadequacies that led to “many citizens feeling disappointed and upset.” Still, protesters were unsatisfied, calling for Lam’s resignation, the withdrawal of the extradition bill, and accountability for police violence. They called for Hong Kong police to rescind the description of the June 12 protest as a “riot.” If prosecuted for rioting, convicted protesters could face up to 10 years in prison.

Share this article with friends.

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