Government

No secret formula

Government | But predicting future corruption really isn’t so hard
by Joel Belz
Posted 5/24/18, 04:07 pm

A longtime reader from northeast Ohio wrote recently to compliment our editorial gifts at predicting the future. “I enjoy reading back issues of WORLD,” she said, “and have been impressed many times by your uncanny ability to ‘see’ ahead, relying on your inspired hunches.”

To this very kind and overly generous friend, let me first say thank you for her note of encouragement. It came right on the heels of a handful of especially harsh letters from a little band of very unhappy WORLD members.

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Associated Press/Photo by Jose Luis Magana

Oklahoma enacts law to protect adoption agencies

by Kent Covington & Lynde Langdon
Posted 5/14/18, 12:30 pm

Oklahoma became the seventh state with a religious liberty law protecting adoption agencies over the weekend. Gov. Mary Fallin signed the bill that helps protect rights of conscience for adoption and foster care agencies that choose, on religious grounds, not to place children in same-sex or transgender households. Republican state Sen. Greg Treat, the bill’s author, pushed back against critics who said the law discriminated against LGBT adoptive parents. Treat said some faith-based groups were afraid to participate in adoptions for fear of being sued for discrimination.

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A political grid

Government | Try this helpful way of evaluating politicians and nations
by Joel Belz
Posted 5/10/18, 01:32 pm

The dawn of yet another political season can no longer be denied. When you hear Nancy Pelosi boast that she’s already decided on the people she expects to appoint as the new leaders of Congress next January, you know we’re back in the political thicket again.

So as you restart the process of sizing up, evaluating, and then backing candidates for office—whether local, regional, or national—let me suggest an admittedly oversimplistic grid. Keep in mind that virtually everyone running for office fits somewhere on this spectrum, which I first proposed in this column 25 years ago:

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