Environment
Power plant in China (AP/Photo by Oded Balilty)

Copenhagen DOA

Environment | As a planned follow-up to the failed Kyoto Protocol, next December's climate summit in Denmark appears to be a non-starter
by Mark Bergin
Posted 4/17/09, 12:00 am

The near universal failure of the Kyoto Protocol to reduce greenhouse gas emissions has for years now pressed environmentalists and politicians to long for a new international climate accord. Through a green haze of optimism, many such global warming alarmists have set their eyes on Copenhagen, site of a long-scheduled climate summit this December. If successful, its aim is to install a replacement plan for when Kyoto officially expires in 2012.

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Associated Press/Photo by Charlie Riedel (file)

'Courage to do nothing'

Environment | Democrats and Republicans chew over Obama's controversial proposal to charge businesses for carbon emissions.
by Emily Belz
Posted 3/12/09, 12:00 am

WASHINGTON-A proposed tax intended to fight climate change is facing some heat on Capitol Hill. The cap-and-trade system, which President Obama has proposed as one way to fund his budget for next year, would require businesses who exceed certain carbon emissions limits to pay for offsets. And now that the proposal is being aired, debate is rising before an energy bill takes shape in committees over the next few weeks.

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Zitha Olsen, Majbrit Hoyrup/©2007 MCT/Newscom

Growing argument

Environment | The emergence of secondary rainforest in the Amazon has ignited a debate about the importance of old growth preservation
by Mark Bergin
Posted 2/28/09, 12:00 am

Rainforests are worth protecting. The dense jungles of vegetation cover only about 7 percent of the world's land surface but house, according to some estimates, about half of all plant and animal species.

So it was that a New York Times story last month questioning the importance of old-growth preservation set off a firestorm in the environmentalist community. A buzz of emails and breathless phone calls swirled between biologists from the Amazon to Southeast Asia.

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