Courts
Associated Press/Photo by Pablo Martinez Monsivais (file)

Supreme Court rules deportation law too vague

by Lynde Langdon
Posted 4/18/18, 10:42 am

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Tuesday that part of federal law that makes it easier to deport immigrants convicted of violent crimes is too vague. In something of a surprise, conservative Justice Neil Gorsuch joined the court’s four liberal members in striking down the provision. Further unexpected was the majority justices’ reliance on a 2015 opinion written by conservative stalwart Justice Antonin Scalia. It was one of the last opinions he wrote before his death in 2016. The current case involved a legal immigrant facing deportation over burglary charges.

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Associated Press/Photo by Mary Altaffer

Cohen, Trump want to shield seized documents

by Lynde Langdon
Posted 4/16/18, 12:49 pm

Attorneys for President Donald Trump and his personal lawyer Michael Cohen are scheduled to appear Monday afternoon in federal court in Manhattan to try to keep prosecutors from examining documents seized in a search last week. Investigators searched Cohen’s hotel room, office, apartment, and safety deposit box and “took everything,” according to a court filing seeking to protect some of the documents.

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Court: Pay equality efforts not enough

by Lynde Langdon
Posted 4/09/18, 03:38 pm

Employers must pay women the same as men for the same work regardless of differences in salaries at their previous jobs, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Monday. The case stems from a lawsuit brought by Aileen Rizo, a Fresno, Calif., public schools employee who learned in 2012 that male counterparts hired after her were making more money. Her salary was based on a 5 percent increase over her previous job at an Arizona school. The 9th Circuit declared such pay practices discriminatory under the Equal Pay Act, a 1963 law signed by President John F.

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