Mindy Belz

Mindy wrote WORLD Magazine's first cover story in 1986 and went on to serve as international editor, editor, and now senior editor. She has covered wars in Syria, Afganistan, Africa, and the Balkans, and she recounts some of her experiences in They Say We Are Infidels: On the Run from ISIS with Persecuted Christians in the Middle East. Mindy resides with her husband, Nat, in Asheville, N.C. Follow her on Twitter @mcbelz.

How much longer?

International | But U.S.
by Mindy Belz
Posted 12/13/97, 12:00 am

The Norwegians may have kept the showers cleaner, but that's history. It's the Americans who now feel like they own the place. Eagle Base in northern Bosnia, once home to a Soviet MiG fighter squadron, then to United Nations troops from Finland and Norway (who frowned on Yankee hygiene when the Americans first came on the scene), has been headquarters to thousands of American soldiers in a deployment that enters its third year this month.

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Where's the beef?

International
by Mindy Belz
Posted 12/06/97, 12:00 am

A tin of beef is a tin of beef? Not so. The canned beef shipped to North Korea more than a year ago by the Mennonite Central Committee is actually the stuff of legends. That's why it was so easily traced back to the MCC when a label from one of the cans was discovered aboard a North Korean submarine.

The Mennonites have a time-honored history of canning meat for shipment to places in need. Mennonite farming communities, usually with a steady supply of beef, are known to spend a week or more at a time canning for a specific overseas cause.

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The tin-cup tyranny

International | In a communist famine, the military never misses a meal
by Mindy Belz
Posted 12/06/97, 12:00 am

Many North Koreans are heading into their third winter of famine. Relief efforts are prying open this most isolated of communist countries, but to Americans embarking on their own season of plenty, a turnaround seems impossibly far away. More than one recent visitor to North Korea reports that in some areas people are eating grass and tree bark to survive. If that picture isn't grotesque enough, it is compounded by new evidence that some food donations have been diverted to North Korea's military.

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