Mary Reichard

Mary is co-host, legal affairs correspondent, and dialogue editor for WORLD Radio. She is also co-host of the Legal Docket podcast. Mary is a graduate of World Journalism Institute and St. Louis University School of Law. She resides with her husband near Springfield, Mo.

Associated Press/Photo by Alex Washburn

9th Circuit considers pregnancy center free speech case

Courts | California law would require faith-based centers to tell clients about abortion services
by Mary Reichard
Posted 6/28/16, 03:00 pm

A federal appeals court is considering whether a state can commandeer pregnancy centers to deliver government-approved messages about abortion options.

Last fall, California Gov. Jerry Brown signed a law requiring all California health facilities to tell clients about the availability of free or low-cost abortion. Pro-life advocates dubbed the law the “Bully Bill” because it forces community-funded crisis pregnancy centers to post signs that refer women to abortion providers in violation of their religious beliefs.

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Associated Press/Photo by Jon Elswick, File

The Supreme Court vs. the Constitution

Supreme Court
by Mary Reichard
Posted 6/07/16, 04:08 pm

The U.S. Constitution mentions the judicial branch of government far fewer times than the other branches. But in the past 50 years, the Supreme Court’s power has grown so much that some say it is seizing power the Constitution doesn’t grant. With decisions about same-sex marriage and health insurance, many people say the high court stepped out-of-bounds. I talked to Paul Moreno, a professor of constitutional history at Hillsdale College, about what’s happening to the Supreme Court.

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Associated Press/Photo by Pablo Martinez Monsivais

More than immigration policy at stake in DAPA case

Supreme Court
by Mary Reichard
Posted 4/25/16, 05:37 pm

Ninety minutes of oral argument last week pitted 26 states, along with the U.S. House of Representatives, against the Obama administration’s unilateral declaration that millions of people in the U.S. illegally can stay, work, and obtain benefits. 

It would be understandable if court-watchers thought of George Orwell’s classic book 1984 after hearing the arguments because plain and clear language took a backseat in the federal government’s presentation.

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