Marvin Olasky

Marvin is editor in chief of WORLD and dean of World Journalism Institute. He joined WORLD in 1992 and has also been a university professor and provost. He has written more than 20 books, including Reforming Journalism. Marvin resides with his wife, Susan, in Austin, Texas. Follow him on Twitter @MarvinOlasky.

Things unseen

| Which is less likely: life after death or life after the Big Bang?
by Marvin Olasky
Posted 4/14/01, 12:00 am

The NCAA basketball tournament ended on April 2 with a hardly surprising result: Players from No. 1 seed Duke cut down the net in the now-traditional victory celebration, with each player keeping a strand or two. I was cheering for No. 15 seed Hampton (the college that educated Booker T. Washington 130 years ago) to go all the way, but that's something for fantasy films.

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Good cause, bad method

National | A WORLD Easter report on Bible translation: Christians have a responsibility to fight anti-Semitism, but changing the Bible is not a legitimate option
by Marvin Olasky
Posted 4/14/01, 12:00 am

Our confidence in the economy may be shaken, but we can still be confident about most Bible translations. One reason for that is the diligent stewarding of biblical texts throughout the centuries. Sure, some minor errors may have dropped in as scribes worked away, but none of those mistakes is crucial. Sure, translators who kneaded the Hebrew and Greek texts into vernacular languages occasionally erred, but they always tried their best to report accurately the words of God's inspired writers.

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You make the call

| Should Washington discriminate against religious groups?
by Marvin Olasky
Posted 4/07/01, 12:00 am

As the baseball season begins, we can look forward to "you make the call" segments during slow moments of televised games. For example, viewers shown a bunt that comes to rest exactly on the foul line will then be asked: Is the ball fair or foul?

Washington officials are playing umpire under the Charitable Choice legislation now in place. They have to decide whether a program is in fair territory or whether it offers ineligible "religious instruction." Their job will get no easier if the White House's faith-based initiative office stays on its present course.

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