J.C. Derrick

J.C. is WORLD’s deputy chief content officer and WORLD Radio’s managing editor based in Dallas. Follow J.C. on Twitter @jcderrick1.

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Jobs solution

Jobs | A Wisconsin program alleviates poverty and unemployment without government dollars—and with the help of a U.S. senator
by J.C. Derrick
Posted 9/02/16, 01:00 am

MILWAUKEE & SHEBOYGAN, Wis.—Milwaukee native Christopher Lane avoided some of the common pitfalls of his inner-city upbringing, but fell into others. Although his parents were married for most of his childhood, their conflict and repeated separation deeply affected him. He largely avoided drugs but spent more than 20 years behind bars for armed robberies in 1989 and 1993.

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Handout

Sebastian Gorka: Fighting the war on terror

Q&A | How history could help us beat jihadism
by J.C. Derrick
Posted 9/02/16, 01:00 am

In 1950, 20-year-old Hungarian informant Paul Gorka received a life sentence in a communist prison after Soviet spy Kim Philby, a British intelligence officer, outed him and other dissidents. The 1956 Hungarian Revolution failed to overthrow Soviet oppressors, but it succeeded in freeing Gorka, who escaped to Great Britain with his future wife.

Today, the couple’s son, Sebastian Gorka, is a U.S. citizen, one of the world’s leading counterterrorism experts, and author of the 2016 New York Times bestseller Defeating Jihad: The Winnable War.

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Associated Press/Photo by Gerald Herbert

Trump softens his immigration rhetoric

Campaign 2016 | But will it change the views of Hispanic voters?
by J.C. Derrick
Posted 8/25/16, 06:04 pm

WASHINGTON—Donald Trump’s immigration rhetoric has taken a sudden, drastic turn—and it appears a change in his immigration policy may not be far behind.

The Republican presidential nominee has made tough talk on immigration a cornerstone of his campaign since he launched his long-shot White House bid more than a year ago. Trump still promises to build a wall on the southern U.S. border, but he’s now backing off his pledge to employ a “deportation force” to remove the country’s roughly 11 million illegal immigrants.

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