Charles Horton, M.D.

Charles is WORLD's medical correspondent. He is a World Journalism Institute graduate and a physician. Charles resides near Pittsburgh with his wife and four children.

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A steroid solution

Medicine | New research suggests that, for many patients, an asthma medication could promote COVID-19 recovery
by Charles Horton, M.D.
Posted 2/18/21, 12:31 pm

Finding effective medical treatments for COVID-19 has been a slog, but researchers are finally making progress. Last year, U.K. researchers demonstrated that the steroid dexamethasone can help patients who have severe cases of COVID-19. Dexamethasone was ineffective in less severe stages of the disease, but scientific detective work has now identified a related steroid that can help prevent the worst cases. 

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An anti-parasitic versus COVID-19

Medicine | Could ivermectin be effective against the coronavirus?
by Charles Horton, M.D.
Posted 2/08/21, 04:32 pm

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers have faced intense pressure to find effective treatments quickly. One response has been to check whether drugs already used for other diseases might be helpful—an approach called drug repurposing. It saves time, since safety tests for existing drugs are already completed and tolerable dosages identified: Researchers only need to learn whether any of those medications could also help against the coronavirus. 

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Vaccine tests and delays

Medicine | The road to a “safe and effective” coronavirus vaccine—and who will get it first
by Charles Horton, M.D.
Posted 10/14/20, 06:50 pm

Federal regulators last week issued new safety guidance for pharmaceutical companies developing coronavirus vaccines. The Food and Drug Administration stated that researchers would need to observe volunteers participating in final-stage vaccine testing for at least two months after giving them their last shot. The two-month period is meant to ensure that volunteers do not develop serious reactions to the vaccines. 

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