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Letters from our readers

A cultural genocide before our eyes

July 18—Jack Pavie/Sumneytown, Pa.

Thank you to June Cheng for an eye-opening article about the plight of the Uighur people in China. I pray that the world will see their suffering, and that the Communist Party will change its ways.

Neil Evans on wng.org

We must certainly pray and work for every person to be free and safe, but even more that they know the God who can give them life, now and forever.

The trouble with traffic stops

July 18—Neil Slattery/Fort Worth, Texas

This was an eye-opener for me, an adamant supporter of Blue Lives Matter, because it detailed the fear so many blacks have over traffic stops. I needed to be better informed of what black kids grow up with.

Vic Tripp/Tucker, Ga.

Everybody agrees what happened to George Floyd is a travesty, but your article suggests systemic racism is the problem. The problem is a lack of accountability and how leftist city governments ceded power to police unions. They bargained away the right to fire police or even discipline them.

Cheap knockoffs

July 18—Lars Nilsson/La Canada, Calif.

Janie B. Cheaney’s observation that we have gone from “try your heart” to “follow your heart” is a brilliant encapsulation of our post-Christian era.

Greyhound is almost A1 cinema

July 18—Rick Slater on Facebook

Kudos to Tom Hanks for sticking to the book regarding Cmdr. Krause’s character. Too many other films have canceled or mocked their characters’ sincere Christian faith.

More than a pharmacy

July 18—Josie Pillman on wng.org

This is an encouraging testimony of God’s faithfulness in times of trial. May the Lord be glorified as this store is restored.

Summer sequels

July 18—Steph Elle on Facebook

Why are our elected officials allowing this lawlessness? The statues don’t belong to thugs!

One family’s corona story

July 18—Valerie Walker on Facebook

I can relate! The situation Andrée Seu Peterson described has played out in many, many homes across the nation.

The other America

July 18—Rodger Hudgins/Bartlesville, Okla.

I enjoyed Marvin Olasky’s column about Checotah. I have worn a wool uniform in July to reenact the Battle of Honey Springs, a very racially diverse battle. But few Native Americans or African Americans are willing to come and wear the uniforms that depict the contributions of their forefathers.

Houses of death

July 18—E. Todd Ryan/Albuquerque, N.M.

Could Belgium’s acceptance of euthanasia be hardening hearts toward the elderly? Watchdog groups worry about euthanizing the sick during the COVID-19 crisis, but I fear a rapidly growing “duty to die” mentality may be a more pernicious, longer-term side effect of the crisis.

Correction

Previous protesters, not worshippers at the Saturate OC event on Huntington Beach, Calif., were the ones promoting coronavirus conspiracy theories (“Viral division,” Aug. 15, p. 42). 

More letters, emails, and comments we didn’t have space for in the print edition:

Greyhound is almost A1 cinema

July 18—Lynn Woodman on Facebook

Excellent movie! I loved that the captain’s faith was real and personal without being cheesy or overbearing.

Lots of action, little restraint

July 18—Kevin Abegg on wng.org

We love Despicable Me 2, but I never would have guessed it would make the list of top-grossing spy films. Obviously, if adults and children alike can enjoy the movie, it’ll sell more tickets. Producers should learn to follow the money.

Not remotely fair

July 18—Tim Laitnen/Arlington, Texas

I agree with Joel Belz about The Wall Street Journal’s misguided assessment of remote learning. Yes, so many things happened at once. Teachers were unprepared and many parents weren’t even making their kids log in to school, but none of this means remote learning itself is a failure.

Reasonable accommodations

July 18—Kathryn M. Lee/Indianapolis, Ind.

The article about the Americans with Disabilities Act took me back to the mid-70s in Salem, Ore. My friend Ruth McEwen and a fellow disabled student developed a documentary about the plight of disabled people who couldn’t get into buildings with stairs, struggled with doors, and faced other challenges. Their pioneering efforts paid off.

Cheap knockoffs

July 18—Roger Kropuenske/Huron, S.D.

Ever since Paul’s missionary journeys, it’s been a struggle to keep the sheep from getting off track.

Local failure, national tragedy

June 27—Bruce P. McKechnie/Malvern, Pa.

I heartily concur, but would add that the aftermath of George Floyd’s death makes me proud to be an American. His killer was promptly removed from his post, arrested, and now awaits trial for murder. The system works.

Both sides, now

June 27—Jorge A. Velez/Long Beach, Calif.

This essay reminded me of Olasky’s earlier column, “Kuyper’s manifesto” (Oct. 14, 2017). I believe today’s cultural revolution is on its way to “the blood and luster of 1789.” The left is undermining our cultural institutions, and the revolutionaries are our children. Pity these children incited for a ruinous cause. Pity more the Church, to whom Kuyper looked for anti-revolutionaries, if all we do is withdraw from the battle.

Michael Small/North Brookfield, Mass.

As a society we are reaping the harvest sown by progressives and their assault on Christianity, discipline, and morality. COVID-19 simply reveals the depth to which we have sunk.

Daniel Silva becomes Dan Brown

July 20—Lisa Bailes on Facebook

I have read all of Silva’s books and have only begun reading The Order. It’s obvious the book was hastily written. I am extremely disappointed that this story discredits Scripture, so maybe this will be the only Silva book I will not complete. Is it time for Gabriel Allon to retire?

Portland pushes back against federal presence

July 20—Hannah Kendall/Salem, Ore.

Thank you for reporting on the events in Portland. We’re appalled, but not surprised. You reported on how Mayor Ted Wheeler was going to meet with protesters. What you didn’t mention was that his own security detail had to whisk him away to protect him from the protesters. Apparently they didn’t like his answer to their demand to defund the police.

J.I. Packer dies at 93

July 17—Rebekah Joy Lovelace on Facebook

He is an excellent example of a man who knew and loved his Savior well, and a faithful servant who has entered into His rest!

Unsupervised pandemic abortions

July 17—Kent W. Brown/Ooltewah, Tenn.

Thank you to Leah Hickman for covering the war against the innocents. It’s hard to believe that I live in a land that makes Hitler, Stalin, Mao, and Pol Pot look like novices. To them, death was an ideological campaign. To us, it is also a “business.” If the sins of the mothers and fathers are visited on the sons and daughters to the third and fourth generation, the payback is going to be unspeakable.

State to worshipers

July 17—Elizabeth J. Kusterer on Facebook

So many churches have buckled too much to government officials. We should try to comply, but also be very concerned with their unbridled power.

The end of illusions

July 15—Joel Bangen/Mammoth Lakes, Calif.

I wish I had read Prodigal Press earlier. It would have helped me sift through the materialist presuppositions of my “Christian” undergraduate training. Olasky’s warnings should be heeded by all Christians in all disciplines, for secular presuppositions seep through everywhere, to root out the misfits and those who refuse to be sycophants.

10 reasons we should still take the coronavirus seriously

July 10—Leann Garvin on Facebook

My frustrations are not the virus, or reasonable precautions, but the constant contradictory information and the obvious power plays of some politicians. But God is teaching good lessons. I just pray people will turn to Him.

Defending Biblical orthodoxy in the Lutheran church

July 10—Stuart Smith on Facebook

The churches in our area that left the ELCA took a step in the right direction. However, the NALC, which most of them joined, didn’t go far enough in its statement on faith regarding Scripture. It rightly professes the Scriptures to be “authoritative” and “inspired” but, unfortunately, stops short of affirming their infallibility and inerrancy.