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Target on target

Target on target

On April 19th, the 241st anniversary of the start of the American Revolution, the Target department store chain announced a transgender policy by which male, female, and confused customers and employees may use whichever restroom (or fitting room) they choose. The American Family Association quickly responded with a “pledge to boycott Target stores” that by April 29 had gained 1 million signatures.

To sign or not to sign? Assuming you don’t want your daughters walking into a women’s room where men might be lurking, that is the question. Market systems are based on peaceful trading growing out of economic interest. Boycotts are an act of economic war. Once boycotts begin, counter boycotts are inevitable, and a society’s divisions become more intense. Do we really want a country, like Spain in the 1930s just before its civil war began, where you can look at a person’s shirt or shoes and instantly know his politics?

“Just war” theory offers a way of analyzing when it’s right to go to war, so let’s work through a parallel checklist for boycotts:

Protecting the innocent: Innocent people must be in imminent danger. Abortion providers are good boycott targets. But when Breitbart.com headlined an April 23 article, “Top 25 stories proving Target’s pro-transgender bathroom policy is dangerous to women and children,” only one of the stories seemed connected to new transgender rules. How big is this problem? Is a Target boycott premature?

Comparative effects: While all sides of a conflict may display rights and wrongs, the suffering by one party must significantly outweigh suffering by the other. If this problem is big, we might concede that the rare guy who doesn’t feel like a guy could prefer a women’s restroom, but does that justify upsetting many women and girls?

Last resort: Since boycotts do have a downside, it’s often better first to try other approaches. What about stockholder action, behind the scenes or at annual meetings? What about a class action suit brought by women who now view Target restrooms as hostile environments? What about electing more leaders willing to stand up to LGBTQ pressure? (So far, portraits of cowardice outnumber those of courage.)

Probability of success: Boycotts should not be used in a futile cause, since evil shot at and missed becomes even stronger—but success is more likely when alternatives are available. The family of one WORLD staffer has shopped regularly at Target, spending about $2,000 per year there. If 1 million similarly spending families boycott Target, its annual revenue of $74 billion falls by $2 billion—not a bankruptcy-inducing hit for a chain with $3 billion in net income, but painful, and a cautionary tale for other companies.

Right intention: Boycotts should be used only in a truly just cause, not for material gain. The American Family Association has done good work over the years, but some organizations fundraise by turning little into big. Sometimes a boycott can be an attempt to plea bargain with God: I buy products made by slave labor or in dictatorial regimes, but since I boycott X I’m still righteous. And Christians can easily overuse boycotts, since so much of contemporary society reflects a pagan outlook.

Consistency: Once we start boycotting, when do we stop? Football fans: Since the NFL uses Super Bowl pressure to support the LGBTQ agenda, will you not watch its games this fall? Do we boycott Edward Jones, Express Scripts, Marriott, MasterCard, Monsanto, Nestlé Purina, and Pfizer, which are among the big companies fighting religious liberty legislation in Missouri? What about Apple, Dell, Disney, Dow Chemical, Time Warner, Twitter, Yelp, and others that convinced Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal to surrender?

Similarly, do we boycott the companies of CEOs and executives who have called for “all legislatures to add sexual orientation and gender identity as protected classes”? That list includes Airbnb, Cisco, Dropbox, eBay, Evernote, Facebook, Google, Groupon, Intel, Intuit, LinkedIn, Lyft, Microsoft, Netflix, Pandora, PayPal, Pinterest, Twitter, Uber, Verizon, Yahoo, Yelp, YouTube, and Zillow. Corporate leaders from Adidas, American Airlines, Citigroup, Gap, JetBlue, JPMorgan Chase, Levi Strauss, Nordstrom, Orbitz, and PepsiCo are among signers of a statement opposing religious liberty bills that purportedly “could allow individuals and businesses to discriminate against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people.”

Jeremiah advised the Israelites living within Babylon’s pagan culture, “Seek the welfare of the city where I have sent you into exile, and pray to the Lord on its behalf, for in its welfare you will find your welfare.” How do we apply that in America today? WWJB: What would Jeremiah boycott?

Comments

  • CJ
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    As is demonstrated by the many comments on this article, there are two separate issues to consider when deciding whether or not to continue shopping at Target, whether one joins a formal boycott or makes an individual choice to shop elsewhere. One is safety, which is the issue primarily raised by women or parents of girls. No one would intentionally endanger their wife or daughter but there are ways to avoid risk while making use of a public restroom.  The other issue is morality. If a person's conscience would be violated by shopping at Target, the rest of us must respect that decision and not attempt to change it or we may find ourselves of causing a brother or sister to stumble. Paul spoke of a parallel issue in his first letter to the Corinthians. 

  • isabellarcher
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    Another commenter mentioned how the Catholic Church may be the only ones taking moral stands.  That is exactly why I, who have always been rather put off by Catholicism, am giving it consideration as the only viable option.  Scandals and celebrity pope aside, Traditional Catholics are offering light and common sense truths at a time when no one else is.  

  • JennLynne's picture
    JennLynne
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    This author does a good job expressing what many of us feel. Worth the few minutes to read.https://stream.org/responding-christians-oppose-target-boycott/

  • JerryM
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    Maybe someone already mentioned this:  I would think Target's prior open advocacy for same-sex marriage is another a factor in deciding whether to boycott. We rightly link the profits from our purchases to the direct (e.g. donations to LGBT groups) and indirect (e.g. advertising campaigns) funding of different companies in advancing the LGBT moral agenda.  Even if it's only a fraction of a penny from our purchases, that's a fraction of a penny from our money we have given to this agenda.  For this reason, one or two years ago, after I learned Jeff Bezos gave 2+ million to back SSM, I have not shopped at Amazon. 

  • Joseph Van Carmichael's picture
    Joseph Van Carm...
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    Let's stop giving business to all those as we are able. But I do not think you listed the Extreme Sexual Political Network (ESPN). What about them? I am constantly embarrassed (and frustrated) by the TV and radio hosts, especially if my children are watching or listening with me.

  • hawaiicharles
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    The so-called debate about sexual assault is a red herring.  That isn't what this issue is about.  It's about the left's attempt "to break down the natural modesty of children; to force them to ignore their own natural and healthy instincts toward privacy and decency regarding the opposite sex in situations that demand propriety; to cause them to view themselves and their own natural, God-given and healthy gut-feelings about being exposed to someone of the opposite gender as hateful, bigoted and mean."The quote is from Jennifer Hartline at The Stream, and her article can be found here:https://stream.org/transgender-bathrooms-americas-transition-sanity-madness/

  • Mel1979
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    I'm not a huge fan of boycotts, but I am a big fan of capitalism. Giving up Target is a big deal for our family. Something we all are mourning a bit; silly, I know. I am that typical mom that really enjoyed going to Target for a purpose and not for a purpose, with my redcard in hand. But this "inclusiveness" is just too much. I don't want to go a store where I feel unsafe sending my teenage daughter into the bathroom by herself.  And where the management would happily standing behind some grown man using the bathroom with her. So I will no longer be shopping there and I'm happy to sign unto the boycott show my solidarity with others who won't be shopping there any longer for the same reason.

  • Keith W
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    I typically agree with this writer on most of what is said, but in this case have to disagree with most points made. For starters, the comparison between a boycott and war is not valid. War is the use of violence to accomplish ones purposes, and in this case a boycott is more an attempt to find an alternate resolution and keep a civil war from breaking out in this country.
    If an allusion to war is required it would be more appropriate to say that a war have been underway for decades but only one side has been fighting it. When that happens the other side gets slaughtered and that is what has happened.
    As far as impact is concerned those numbers are not accurate. For starters, for every person that signs the petition that are many others that are in agreement and will support some part of what is planned, including this writer and many others that have posted here. Secondly, for most large lumbering enterprises like Target, their cost structures, including fixed costs like infrastructure, and more variable costs like people and inventory, are based on estimates. When those estimates prove wildly incorrect it will be months and years before they will be able to align them. In the meantime, much of the revenue loss will end up coming directly off their bottom line. Thirdly, the impact will not be evenly distributed, meaning that some areas (probably red states) will feel a significant higher percentage of issues. Marginal stores in these areas will be forced to close, and profitable ones will become questionable at best. Target's profit will plummet, its stock price will tank, and the CEO will be looking for a new job shortly.
    Talking has accomplished the present. If any areas of this country will survive providing some degree of freedom then concerted action is now required.

  • Steve SoCal
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    For me one of the key issues is whether a business is actively pushing an anti-God agenda, such as I believe Paypal did through their rainbow-flag-flying outburst against North Carolina.  Choosing to not financially support a business like that, and maybe politely letting them know my reasons, seems to be an appropriate (and NOT warlike) response... so they can see that there are intelligent and polite people who don't subscribe to their (im)moral campaign.  However, if our goal is to boycott any business whose leadership and policies don't perfectly align with our personal beliefs, we'll have a hard time finding anyplace to do business, and we'll only make enemies in the process.

  • Dean from Ohio
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    Ed Walkwitz is right. We are in a spiritual and cultural war. So we pray after the Lord's prayer, and place concentration of "force" (economic influence) that strategically will destroy the Enemy's ability to wage war and rescue the captives. Prayer first, then preaching the word, then living our lives as salt and light, then making disciples. A polite boycott is both salt and light, and IS seeking the good of the city where we live.

  • Dean from Ohio
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    "Do we boycott Edward Jones, Express Scripts, Marriott, MasterCard, Monsanto, Nestlé Purina, and Pfizer, which are among the big companies fighting religious liberty legislation in Missouri? What about Apple, Dell, Disney, Dow Chemical, Time Warner, Twitter, Yelp, and others that convinced Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal to surrender? Similarly, do we boycott the companies of CEOs and executives who have called for “all legislatures to add sexual orientation and gender identity as protected classes”? That list includes Airbnb, Cisco, Dropbox, eBay, Evernote, Facebook, Google, Groupon, Intel, Intuit, LinkedIn, Lyft, Microsoft, Netflix, Pandora, PayPal, Pinterest, Twitter, Uber, Verizon, Yahoo, Yelp, YouTube, and Zillow. Corporate leaders from Adidas, American Airlines, Citigroup, Gap, JetBlue, JPMorgan Chase, Levi Strauss, Nordstrom, Orbitz, and PepsiCo are among signers of a statement opposing religious liberty bills that purportedly 'could allow individuals and businesses to discriminate against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people.'”Yes, where we can. Companies who sign statements like these are already becoming corrupt, and so it makes business sense as well to avoid them. JPMorganChase, for example, was a paragon of utter incompetence in "administering" our home mortgage until we refinanced with USAA. The customer "service" representatives at Chase had the mathematical understanding of third graders. So, I'm not surprised to see them floating down the cultural stream, belly up and stinking.

  • TMJ's picture
    TMJ
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    Will boycotting Target change their policy?  Not likely. It may get the spokesperson and PR team who foolishly publicized their policy fired.   Should Christians boycott Target? That decision should be made by the individual after prayerful consideration. If you believe that God is calling you to boycott, you should do so. If you believe that He is calling you to continue to shop there to be a "witness", then you should that instead.  Either way, asking for and following His direction in how best to approach situations where the culture is at odds with His teaching is the best way. Often, not easy, but best.

  • Cox
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    A couple years ago, around 9:00 am. I was traveling with my family on the Florida Turnpike, a toll that connects travelers with many of Florida's attractions. We stopped at one of the very busy rest stops and went to the ladies restroom. As usual, it was very busy. As I walked toward a stall with the door open I noticed a man doing his business. There were more than 12-15 women and girls in the restroom so there wasn't a risk of being physically assaulted, but the restroom was very quiet with great tension. He simply walked out without washing his hands. No one wanted to approach him for fear he was "on something" or mentally ill. Not sure of his sexual orientation, he looked 100% male. I can vouch that none of the women and girls were comfortable him in women's restroom.

  • JennLynne's picture
    JennLynne
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    Mr. Olasky, you do a great job of helping your readers think things through instead of just blindly reacting, and for that I thank you. Many times through the years I have had a change of opinion after reading your perspective on different issues. But this time I have to agree with a few of the other moms here. This is not complicated. I am a woman and I have three daughters. If Target cannot bring themselves to provide changing rooms and bathrooms that are for women and not for men then I won't be going there. Very simple.Should I be arrogant in my refusal to shop there? No. Arrogance has no place in my witness as a Christian.Should I teach my daughters that there are lines that are not to be crossed? Yes. Absolutely. And this is one of them. With all due respect, your tone in this article seems a little smug. I'm a nobody - just a mom. But for whatever it is worth, it's my opinion that writing an article making Christians feel like they are being silly and misguided for doing what they can to protect their children does not help us solve this problem. 

  • Truth2Freedom
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    Mr. Olasky, I respect your work and have been a long-time subscriber to World and have many of your books.  However, this reveals why Christians still have found no effective strategy how to identify, quantify, hate, and resist evil.  The cultural Marxists divide and conquer... and advance their agenda of persecution because there is never any effective opposition.  This type of pacifism in the church is why great evils like Hitler and ISIS come into existence... because Christians just could not become indignant at the little evils.  Isn't this what Niemoller was saying in retrospect?  My former pastor reviewed the Eric Metaxas "Bonhoeffer" book and correctly identifies what was wrong with the church in Germany:  a supine and pusillanimous church that laid down without a whimper to Hitler's thuggery and was obsequiously compliant to the Fuhrer's demands.  Referring to Babylon's pagan culture and asking what would Jeremiah boycott are misleading because the circumstances are much different:  this is 2016 and the U.S. has a Constitution which defends liberty which many excellent Christians have died to preserve so can we get a little bit indignant once in awhile and fight for something?  How does Romans 12:9 and Ecclesiastes 3:1-8 inform the Christian to live faithfully in an evil world?  Is there a time to hate and for war?  Daniel resolved to not defile himself with the king's food and wine; I am sure Daniel had his critics and dissenters trying to discourage him from being so narrow-minded (Daniel 1:8).  Come on, seriously, it is time to get some backbone.  This non-opposition mindset is why Trump is getting close to winning the GOP nomination.  Thank God for leaders like Franklin Graham who understand that one aspect of the pastor's role is to be as a watchman on the wall (Ezekiel 3 and 33); though he too misses the mark at times and is inconsistent because he should not have spoken in opposition when the Southern Baptists were moving to encourage parents to pull children out of public government run schools.  I see in the evangelical church a preferred way of martyrdom and dying for one's faith... just be quiet, resist not.  There is more than one way God calls people to die for their faith; some die fighting and they are just as faithful as those who remain on the sidelines.  This popular mindset among Christian leaders also shows why only a minority of the population supported the American Revolution and resistance to tyranny; very few want to stand up to evildoers because it will cost a great deal.  This is why Francis Schaeffer rightly called believers stupid 35 years ago in his Christian Manifesto... he identified then that we were facing tyranny.  Lastly Mr. Olasky, you have written much about compassion...  effective compassion calls for us to stand up and protect those who are losing their business and dreams and now these same cultural Marxists want to allow sexual predators access to women and children in restrooms and showers.  I agree with Michael Brown -- a calm loving Christian spirit at this time calls for a Target boycott.

  • creekmama
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    I signed the boycott, but more importantly, I wrote the company directly explaining clearly but politely my decision to cease shopping at their stores for the time being.  If they change their policy to reflect concern for the safety and privacy of women and girls, my daughter and I will return.  I do not expect America's second largest retailer to change its stance, but I am not under any obligation as a Christian to shop at a store where I feel unsafe and disrespected.  Target made its decision, and I made mine.

  • Duncan McPherson
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    I second SNelson's point about not funding your own persecution. We have a company broadcasting that Christians aren't welcome. Why would any Christians choose to ignore that and enter anyway? 

  • Iron Duke
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    Regarding questions as if the boycott will work or not - I would say in the near term, it is already working.  I think we should not be lured into the idea that Christians are the divisive ones wanting to rock the boat.  Theses issues are themselves being driven by a vocal group of activists who have overwhelming support by the media. The media repeatedly reports favorably on these social issues which end up brainwashing recipients who hear very little opposing views.  These proponents are the ones who are attempting to overturn societal norms that have been a part of Western Civilization since the beginning and pretty much a part of civilization since the beginning.  These actions are harmful to those who need help - not accolades. The good news is that help is available - at least until these activists get their way and make helping those who struggle with these issues illegal. There is a bandwagon effect by John Q Public, who blindly follows after these trends thinking that this is what normal is as they get inundated with coverage by the news media, the entertainment industry, actors.....etc. all thinking they are supporting worthy causes.  But, in reality, they squash any debate or valuable discussion on these issues because they engage in a discussion by silencing the opposing views by calling those who hold these views all kind of names and titles such as bigots, racists, xenophobes...etc.  If we stay silent, nobody else in society today will challenge views that can be more harmful to society and those who need the help.  In addition, we live in a so-called "free" society -  we should be free to engage in peaceful protests, engage in discussion and be free to speak our views - especially when these views may be the most helpful views that those who suffer from issues such as Transgenderism need to hear.  It is unfortunate that Christians have become way too silent over the years, the Church is far too silent and not supportive (maybe with the exception of the Roman Catholic Church).......from a moral view, a responsible citizen view, a Christian representing biblical truth...etc., it may be irresponsible to not get involve in engagements such as the Target protests!  Just War?  Where would society today be on the abortion issue if we stayed silent and were not actively protesting this issue?

  • Soapbxn's picture
    Soapbxn
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    Very good food for thought and lots of excellent discussion.  I have always been fairly restrictive for our family on shopping choices - trying very hard not to buy items made in sweatshops, by slave labor, made in China (because of terrible human rights), etc.  It can be exhausting shopping within the "parameters" and does it truly make a difference?  On the other hand how can such companies pat themselves on the back for being so "anti-discriminatory" while openily supporting discrimination to a huge population group, namely Christians?

  • isabellarcher
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    It feels as if Mr. Olasky is rather smugly scoffing at all the little fools out here getting themselves worked up, and probably he does have a point if people are just now waking up to the fact that we are in an upside down creepy world.There's a lot more wrong with corporate American than just Target.  And there's a lot more babies being aborted than what each of us can get out and protest for.  Or, at least, that is what we are told.  So, we do nothing because we can only do so little anyway?  Maybe, we do all we can.  And so what if consistency means that people have to give up some fanny shaking NFL or Paypal or the usury-thriving Citibank or so on.

  • Daniel40
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    'Tis one thing to boycott in protest of a company's larger policy.  And i acknowledge the concerns here listed.  But 'tis another to simply say, "i don't feel comfortable shopping in a place where i or my family has no reasonable expectation of privacy from the opposite gender if we need to use your restroom, and so long as there are alternatives, i will shop somewhere that offers me this basic courtesy."

  • Laura W
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    For me, it's pretty simple. As a woman, I would not feel safe in a Target restroom or fitting room with this policy in place. If a store is unwilling to take basic measures to protect my safety and privacy (or that of any other girl or women who comes through their doors), why would I give them my business?

  • sahmpaw
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    I signed it because I have a 6 year old daughter.  It's to protect her.  We need boundaries.  Target has crossed the line.  

  • West Coast Gramma's picture
    West Coast Gramma
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    The only Christian commission that I am aware of is the Great Commission Christ gave, "Go therefore and make disciples..." Nor did Paul who stayed 1-1/2 years in carnal Corinth and some two plus years in Ephesus command anyone to "Clean up this city and boycott those who sell idols or eat meat sacrificed to them." No, he taught the gospel of salvation through faith in Jesus Christ. For the most part, people are not multi-taskers when it comes to major life investments. If I invest my time and energy in a political fight against "evil" in order to make my neighborhood and America as a whole the way I feel it should be for my own children, then what becomes of Christ's Great Commission to me? Do I not have the divided heart and double vision that Christ warned against? Pre-resurrection Earth is not and never will be "heaven." A morally perfect place to live is the promise of the afterlife, not the present. New Testament Christians, especially in a place like Corinth, were surrounded by evil and immorality on all sides, yet they managed to live Christian lives and the church grew. Christians do not in fact own America. America, no matter how it started, is currently a multi-cultural, multi-valued, ever-changing place. It seems that rather than complaining, we should be teaching ourselves and others how to live a life of joy and peace in the midst of the wickedness that surrounds us. That's what Christ taught his disciples and what Paul taught the early churches. We need to teach our children survival skills rather than complaining skills. We may not like the world as it is, but this is the time, place, and culture to which the Lord has sent us, not so that we might pursue our own comfort and the comfort of our own families, but so that the gospel might be spread to a wicked and dying world. When we get to heaven, we will no longer have these issues. And will Christ say to us at the judgment, "And what did you do about the bathrooms in Target?" or will he say, "And what did you do to proclaim to the lost and dying my blood, which is strong enough and clean enough to cleanse every bathroom on earth and every single person who uses them?" Time is running out. Do we as Christians need to get our heads out of the toilet and into the will of Christ? WWJD is a good question to ask here. Is Christ more concerned about bathrooms or about his lost children? Jesus loved and touched all manner of sinners, even Pharisees. I might want to keep some tracts handy in my purse if I ever run into an identifiable transgender in the ladies' restroom. I might be the only person to offer this one love as Jesus would. "Remember that you were a slave in the land of Egypt and the LORD your God redeemed you..."

  • CGK's picture
    CGK
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    Interesting challenge, Marvin!  But actually, each of the companies you listed has major competitors.  It's actually really easy to delete the Yelp app from your phone and download Zomato instead.  You can change your search engine to Bing.  All you have to do to get rid of PayPal is call them to close your account.  (I did!)  Instead of heading to the Gap, Levi Strauss, or Nordstrom when you go shopping, check out their main competitors: American Eagle, J Crew, Neiman Marcus, Saks.  We're not as helpless as you make us sound! 

  • MRW
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    I have been boycotting Target (by not shopping there) since they stopped allowing Salvation Army Bell Ringers at their stores at Christmas time. No reason to start shopping there now.

  • LegaStacy
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    Marvin, you present legitimate questions, but fail to posit positive solutions.   We'll look for those in your next installment.  What do YOU think Jeremiah (or Jesus?) would have us do?

  • Mark EP
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    Here's an article that discusses the idea "that advocating for religious liberty or opposing the latest advance of the sexual revolution doesn’t present Christians as 'compassionate' or 'loving.'"http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/434734/christians-dont-fall-compassion-trap

  • CarolinaDave's picture
    CarolinaDave
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    I will probably quietly determine to avoid patronizing Target because of their decision in favor of trans gender bathrooms.. However, my concern over a large organized boycott is from the perspective that our culture already loves to paint evangelical Christianity as a religion of "no" stereotyped for all the things we stand against.  This boycott simply plays into their hand.  There are a growing number of things we must carefully choose to avoid in our culture, decisions that need to be carefully and clearly grounded in scripture.  However, evangelical Christianity is intrinsically a religion of "yes" - a living faith that has something wonderful to offer to the lost around us.  We need to be careful to consistently share love and kindness to our enemies in spite of their hostility, showing by our lives and what we say that we have something wonderful - a personal relationship with God through Jesus Christ - that we can share with them.  From the book of Acts forward to the present, this is the message that has changed lives.When we "declare war" on our enemies with any other weapon than God's love we generally lose every time, because they are better at using those weapons than we are.  Only God's love and salvation through Jesus Christ can melt hearts of stone.

  • Jkirk77
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    I have mixed feelings about boycotts. It make's me wonder about their effectiveness. We do day-to-day business with many corporations, individuals, etc..., that do not adhere to the Christian worldview. I understand the outrage when a gun is put to the head of local state governments, schools and  citizens that either you comply with our LGBT extremist worldview or we don't do business or your out of business.  When corporations like Target, Paypal, Disney, Netflix, NFL, etc... all jump aboard the LGBT extremist bandwagon and where they should be ashamed but they are not because they have  fallen prey to a lie. They love the creature rather then the Creator. "Ye adulterers and adulteresses, know ye not the friendship of the world is enmity with God? whosoever therefore will be a friend of the world is the enemy of God."  James 4:4 KJV  We must respond as ambassadors for Christ.

  • M Cleere
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    The question of "Well, if we decide to boycott Target, where do we stop?" is an inevitable, but for me, not unanswerable question. Like charity, or even prayer, just because we can't give to each and every good and worthy cause out there, and just because we simply cannot pray with any specificity or intention for each and every person in the world in genuine need, does that mean we cannot or should not bother giving to or praying for something/someone? In other words, just because I cannot do all the good I would and meet all the needs truly worthy of being met that exist in the world doesn't mean that I should not even try and do something in the service of good. Will it matter in the end if I (or even I and 999,999 like-minded others) stop shopping at Target, or using PayPal, or watching football? It's unlikely, but still, it's something. It's trying to send a message in our own, small, perhaps thoroughly insignificant way. Can we boycott every commercial and or governmental enterprise that participates in and/or promotes, either directly or indirectly, an explicitly and intentionally worldly, sinful agenda, even to the point of seeking to restrict, if not entirely do away with the legal rights of those who disagree with them? I don't think that's realistic; the tentacles of sin are too many and too varied and reach too far throughout the culture to make that possible. However, when we do see them clearly, and we can make some statement against them, however ultimately futile or insignificant that statement may seem, well... I would not discourage anyone from doing so. Besides, do we only fight the battles we're guaranteed to win? No, it's the reason – the cause – that makes the battle worth fighting, not the prospects that we'll "win" in the end (which, of course, we – or He – will). Thank you     

  • Janet S
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    As I observe our morally decaying nation and world there are really tough decisions we each must make, but I am reminded of John 17.  Jesus prayed for us (He knew this would happen) not that we would be taken out of the world but that we would be protected and that just as God the Father sent Him into the world He is sending us into the world.  I am called to live in a ever increasing hostile world (toward Christians) but I must be light and salt. I am to seek peace when possible while staying true to God's Word.  I am not sure how to do that always, but it is not by retreating or by making lost people the enemy.  My enemy is satan, not the LGBT community or their supporters.  James tells us to ask for wisdom when we don't know what to do.

  • MTJanet
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    I have had personal boycotts for years and years - the NFL being an easy one for me with their degradation and exploitation of women being a longstanding problem - but having a Christian group calling for a boycott is a bold move.  I already boycott Target, so it would be very simple to go sign with them; however, I will have to consider this more.  Where do we apply it is indeed the question and where does it stop?   

  • Mark EP
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    I did sign the boycott and have twice this week already shopped pointedly at "not Target." I closed my PayPal account and yes, NFL football has been punted off my entertainment list. That said, I'm not normally the boycotting sort, but this article resonated:http://www.theblaze.com/contributions/dear-target-were-just-tired-of-the-nonsense-thats-why-were-boy...I like the approach advocated by Faith Driven Consumer. We get it--companies are going to market to a variety of world views; we don't have to agree with those world views, but we ask that you include Christianity among them and don't explicitly snub us. Target dragged itself into this mess by choice.

  • SNelson
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    Like Rich277, my reaction to stop using Paypal, not going to Disney/Marvel movies, and stop shopping at Target (which actually happened years ago), has little to do with a boycott and is much more about not funding my own persecution. 

  • Hans's picture
    Hans
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    One very good reason not to boycott Target is because when we do selectively boycott over issues like this, we look like hypocritical tools.

  • Melissa D's picture
    Melissa D
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    I recently wrote on this subject as well: http://thatbalancingact.blogspot.com/2016/04/to-boycott-or-not-to-boycott.html

  • Ed Walkwitz's picture
    Ed Walkwitz
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    Good thoughts.  Tough call.  Since you're using the "war" analogy: Why bomb one location when 50 other locations are equally deserving?  Answer: because it's a strategic location, and bombing it would help win the war.  If enough people united behind this "targeted" boycott, it might send a strategic message to other companies and all of society.  The "reverse boycott" Christians did of Chick-Filet seemed to have a good effect.  But it would have to be united to work.

  • Rich277
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    How about instead of a loud, nasty, confrontational boycott, we simply stop giving them our business.  If they ask why, we tell them, calmly and politely.  I've been turned off by the vengeful, prideful attitude taken by some who tout boycotts.  But I'm more repelled by the idea of enriching businesses who are trying to undermine or even  destroy my freedom to practice my faith as I am led.

  • William Peck 1958's picture
    William Peck 1958
    Posted: Tue, 05/10/2016 02:56 pm

    I'm getting the feeling that Mr. Olasky doesn't think the Target boycott is the proper response. I have been wondering if North Carolina did an "after action assessment", would they still conclude their bathroom bill was the proper action to take ? Did they even do a "risk assessment" prior to (sorry) popping off this bill ? The left's response is totally predictable.In 57 years, I've only ever seen one man dressed as a woman, in Baltimore. Pretty creepy, and truthfully, you don't want to find him in EITHER bathroom. And the reason for this concern is that the person is MESSED UP, as evidenced by cross-dressing.imo, The risk of getting assaulted by a man in a woman's bathroom is pretty much the same no matter what the law says.

  • veritas's picture
    veritas
    Posted: Sat, 07/23/2016 07:03 pm

    I've not been to Target since they banned the Salvation Army around 2004. The Target board is so leftwing that they would rather lose money than do the right thing. No big deal, there are many places to buy clothing and  other necessities.

  • veritas's picture
    veritas
    Posted: Sat, 07/23/2016 07:06 pm

    I question the "probablity of success" argument. What is "success"? If Target survives or thrives on atheist, agnostic, and others, is that failure? Success is NOT contributing money to the problem, and protecting our families from sexual predators on Megans list abusing the bathroom policy.